Japan ninja student gets top markings for writing essay in hidden ink

Japan ninja student gets top markings for writing essay in hidden ink

Share this with

These are outside links and will start in a window that is new

They are external links and will start in a window that is new

Close share panel

A Japanese pupil of ninja history who handed in a paper that is blank offered top marks – after her professor realised the essay ended up being printed in hidden ink.

Eimi Haga then followed the ninja technique of “aburidashi”, expending hours soaking and crushing soybeans to result in the ink.

The words showed up whenever her teacher heated the paper over their gasoline kitchen kitchen stove.

“It is one thing I discovered through a novel once I was little,” Ms Haga told the BBC. “we simply hoped that no-one would show up with the exact same idea.”

Ms Haga is enthusiastic about ninjas – covert agents and assassins in medieval Japan – since watching an animated tv program as a kid.

The first-year student took a class in ninja history, and was asked to write about a visit to the Ninja Museum of Igaryu after enrolling at Mie University in Japan.

“As soon as the professor stated in class which he will give a higher mark for imagination, I made the decision that i might make my essay stick out from other people,” she stated.

“I offered an idea for a time, and hit upon the thought of aburidashi.”

Ms Haga, 19, wet soybeans instantaneously, then smashed them before squeezing them in a fabric. Continue reading “Japan ninja student gets top markings for writing essay in hidden ink”